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The New Washington

The New Washington - top government contractors - best government contracting event

The New Washington - top government contractors - best government contracting eventThe Faces of a “New“ Washington-Power Chart

Change came to the nation's capital this week, as President Obama was sworn in as our 44th President. Navigating through the myriad of names and faces of the new administration can be a daunting task. That's why The Financial Times (FT) created an interactive “Power Chart” detailing a veritable who's who in the new administration. The chart provides a dynamic perspective on the key players within this new presidency. Simply move your mouse over the 50+ links to read each profile. A grouping feature is also included if you are interested in seeing President Obama's Chicago connections, past classmates, etc. We are hoping FT plans to keep the chart up-to-date since the theme of the incoming administration is “Change”. Try it here.

The New Washington - top government contractors - best government contracting event

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Can You Hear Me Now?

The New Washington - top government contractors - best government contracting eventFor weeks now, DC area residents and inaugural visitors have been prepped for the crowds, lack of facilities, and traffic jams expected during President Obama's inauguration. Are cell phones next? In response to the overwhelming attendance expected at inaugural activities, cellular companies are taking the unusual step of asking customers to limit their usage. The crowd of 2 million is expected to be comprised of a generation entirely comfortable with technology, but perhaps unused to its heretofore unforeseen limits. As Joe Farren, spokesman for the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association, an industry trade group, states, “We can only bend the laws of physics so much.” Click here to read more

More Predictions! Ten GovCon Predictions for ’09

Wouldn’t it be great if you could gather the area’s top executives in a room and get their predictions for 2009? Look no further. Last week, we shared predictions from some of the area's top executives on how this coming year will play out for the federal marketplace. This week we’re sharing more. Check out these executives’ predictions on top government contracting trends to watch in 2009 “” and let us know if you agree.
Robin Lineberger, Executive Vice President, BearingPoint


Robin Lineberger, Executive Vice President, BearingPoint“With significant challenges facing the nation and a new administration taking the reins, 2009 will usher in a period of unprecedented change. While there will be many new opportunities to support TARP, healthcare reform, homeland security and ongoing defense efforts, greater fiscal discipline will continue to drive agency agendas. To that end, we'll see focus on strategies that will improve resource utilization, increase an agency's ability to quickly adapt to changing priorities, and provide enhanced services, cost reduction and resiliency.” “” Robin Lineberger, Executive Vice President, BearingPoint

Harry Martin, President & CEO, Intelligent Decisions“In 2009 there will be more pressure than ever to innovate and find new ways to provide more for less. This will lead to an increase in government-wide standardization and further reduction in department-level purchasing power. IT systems developed with imbedded security will be increasingly important as organizations seek to control costs by pushing security requirements back on vendors and contractors. Government initiatives that create immediate returns and leverage federal economies of scale (e.g. PowerManagement/GreenIT, TIC, FDCC and SMARTBuy) will be increasingly important. Unfunded and expensive mandates with payoffs far in the future, like IPv6 and HSPD12, will languish with minimal progress.”
“” Harry Martin, President & CEO, Intelligent Decisions

Stacy Mendler, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Alion Science and Technology“The Obama campaign made extensive use of the web and social networking, which gave them a more efficient way of working, a faster pace and a better result. The new administration will likely continue to emphasize technology throughout the government, so we expect even greater demand for higher quality, more effective products and services, and it will be up to technology solutions companies to develop the tools and management processes that can support these needs.” “” Stacy Mendler, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Alion Science and Technology

Phil Nolan, Chairman, President and CEO, Stanley“We believe the reset and retrograde of military equipment for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan will continue as a key priority for the Department of Defense in 2009. Effective modernization and enhancement of existing systems ““ as opposed to new program initiatives ““ will be the principal focus for many federal and defense agencies.” “” Phil Nolan, Chairman, President and CEO, Stanley

Anthony Robbins, Vice President, Federal Sales, Sun Microsystems, Inc.“2009 will be shaped by significant events such as the change of administration, the pending drawdown of the war effort, and of course the national and global economic issues. As a result, competition for government IT dollars will increase, which is actually good for the tax payers. There will be pressure to contain and manage IT costs, resulting in many opportunities for the IT community to provide value-based solutions and services to support the important government initiatives. I expect the companies that will win in this marketplace at this time will have established relationships based on trust and value, and those who care first about the government's mission and associated challenges.“ “” Anthony Robbins, Vice President, Federal Sales, Sun Microsystems, Inc.

George D. Schindler, President, CGI Federal“Clearly, the financial crisis and economic recovery will dominate 2009. Federal agencies will turn increasingly toward public““private partnerships and shared services as a way to manage costs. With significant revenue short falls, states will focus on “˜keeping the trains running' for essential citizen and IT services. In this unprecedented economic situation, the new administration will drive more fiscal discipline and accountability as well as the need for increased transparency across the government sector.“
“” George D. Schindler, President, CGI Federal

Sam Seymour, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Centurum, Inc.“Despite all the pre-election campaign messaging, 2009 will likely sustain the same, if not more, defense opportunities. Substantive federal prospects will emerge with the new administration, benefiting companies presently in the sector, as well as those that are able to rapidly diversify. The current economic situation will directly benefit businesses with both strong prime contract backlogs and financial capability, as the industrial base is thinned out by once viable “” but now weakened “” competitors. The tables have turned with respect to the landscape between job seekers and employers, as employers will have more options regarding retention and recruiting.“ “” Sam Seymour, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Centurum, Inc.

Stan Sloane, President & CEO, SRA“For 2009, I think the priorities will be getting the US economy back in gear, stabilizing Iraq, Afghanistan and the Middle East, dealing with global environmental issues, and addressing threats to US security at home (physical and economic threats). That translates into a focus on supporting our key customers in civil government, several of whom are trying to deal with various aspects of the economic meltdown (like FDIC), or helping our DoD, Intel and Homeland Security customers execute their missions effectively. We're also weighing in on things like “˜Green IT,' which has potentially significant benefit to the planet, and cybersecurity. By the way, I think we'll see a change in the government procurement system to minimize the frequency of protests, and make it more onerous for companies to file frivolous protests. The current system is untenable, is costing the taxpayers money, and is critically affecting government agencies' ability to field needed capabilities.“
“” Stan Sloane, President & CEO, SRA

Dennis Stolkey, Senior Vice President, U.S. Public Sector, EDS, an HP company“The most predictable thing about 2009 is that it will be unpredictable. Some industry pundits are predicting IT disaster, others a cornucopia of IT opportunity. However, it’s pretty clear that information technology services and IT innovation will play a vital enabling role in helping the new administration address its economic and international priorities in a wide range of mission areas “” from healthcare, environmental sustainability and infrastructure to cybersecurity, national defense and intelligence. This year, more than ever, we will see even stronger collaboration between government and industry to help tackle these critical, complex issues.” “” Dennis Stolkey, Senior Vice President, U.S. Public Sector, EDS, an HP company

Susan Zeleniak, Vice President, Verizon Federal“Federal agencies will utilize advanced technology more than ever in their quest to deliver outstanding service to the citizen. The Obama team demonstrated near flawless use of advanced communications and information technology as a means of connecting with citizens during the presidential campaign, and this focus on citizen-centric technology will be a top priority for the new administration.“
“” Susan Zeleniak, Vice President, Verizon Federal

So, there’s our list. What predictions would you add? What’s on your radar for the year ahead in the government contracting space? Let us know!

CEO SPOTLIGHT: Jerry Edgerton of Command Information on IPv6 - top government contractors - best government contracting event

CEO SPOTLIGHT: Jerry Edgerton of Command Information on IPv6

Former Defense Secretary William Cohen: Defense spending not changing anytime soon - top government contractors - best government contracting event

Former Defense Secretary William Cohen: Defense spending not changing anytime soon