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Hackers Steal Hundreds of Credit-Card Numbers from Restaurant Patrons

Visits to several California-based restaurants turned out to much more expensive than customers ever imagined. Police in Roseville last week revealed that nearly 200 customers had their credit-card numbers stolen after patronizing the eateries.

While the police did not reveal which restaurants have been affected due to the ongoing investigation, they said the restaurants themselves are not responsible.

“We believe the breach is not actually at the restaurant but a third-party vendor that’s in the process between using your credit card at the restaurant and actually billing the bank,“ Capt. Stefan Moore told 3KCRA.

Because of the complexity of the scheme, Roseville police has asked the Secret Service for help catching the criminals. Meanwhile, in the nearby town of Davis, police are dealing with similar issues. They have seen a 50 percent increase in identity thefts. While police won’t say where the cards are being copied, they revealed that crooks use them at Target stores in the Bay Area and as far away as Irvine, Calif.

Although the two cases are not related, they point toward the growing trend of identity theft. In June, criminals in Indianapolis tapped into the credit-card swipe machines at a local eatery and stole the card numbers from several customers, wiping out their bank accounts. At the time the crime was reported, investigators were still trying to figure out how outside hackers had managed to penetrate firewalls and encrypted codes to steal credit-card details.

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