Japan Institutes Harsher Penalties for Hackers

Japan has reportedly passed new legislation that will impose tougher prison terms for those who create or spread malware, according to Japan Times.

Under the new cyber crime bill, those found guilty of creating or distributing malware could get a maximum of three years in prison or approximately $6,250 in fines. Possessing or storing a virus can result in up to two years in prison or $3,745 in fines. Sending emails containing sexually explicit images to “random groups of people” will also be illegal.

Additionally, the new law allows authorities to seize or copy data from computer servers that are connected via online networks to a computer seized for investigation. Authorities will also be able to request Internet service providers to store communications logs for up to 60 days.

The lack of a national cyber crime legislation that punishes hackers has made it difficult for Japanese authorities to pursue cyber attacks on government offices, businesses and individuals, Japan Times said.

 

 

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