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Pentagon to Develop Computer System to Prevent Another Wikileaks

Pentagon to Develop Computer System to Prevent Another Wikileaks - top government contractors - best government contracting event
Photo: pentagon.spacelist.org

Pentagon to Develop Computer System to Prevent Another Wikileaks - top government contractors - best government contracting event
Photo: pentagon.spacelist.org

The Pentagon is currently working to prevent another WikiLeaks situation within the department. Wired.com recently reported a group of military funded scientists are developing a sophisticated computer system that can scan and interpret every key stroke, log-in and uploaded files over the Pentagon’s networks.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency  awarded about $9 million for five institutions’ work for the project. Georgia Tech will be leading the institutions and will kick off an initiative called the “Proactive Discovery of Insider Threats Using Graph Analysis and Learning.”

The project works to find potentially dangerous insiders before they are able to cause any damage and break the law.

According to Wired.com, current military analysts investigate five out of thousands of anomalous computer activities a day. PRODIGAL would make sure analysts were looking into the most important ones.

The program keeps information on users, their search history, behavior as well as scans emails, text-messages, log-ins and web browsing. The computer system would be able to scan 250 million emails, IMs and file transfers daily.

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