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Former Lockheed Aeronautics EVP Ralph Heath to Join Textron’s Board of Directors

Former Lockheed Aeronautics EVP Ralph Heath to Join Textron's Board of Directors - top government contractors - best government contracting event
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Former Lockheed Aeronautics EVP Ralph Heath to Join Textron's Board of Directors - top government contractors - best government contracting event
Ralph Heath

Ralph Heath, former executive vice president of aeronautics at Lockheed Martin, has been appointed to Textron‘s board of directors effective January 1, 2017.

Textron Chairman and CEO Scott Donnelly said in a press release published Thursday that Heath will bring experience in the aerospace and defense industry, government defense programs and international business development.

Heath held a 37-year career at Lockheed’s aeronautics business prior to his retirement in 2012.

He has worked as EVP and general manager of the F-22 Raptor program from 2002 to 2005 as well as EVP and chief operating officer of the Bethesda, Maryland-based aerospace and defense company’s aeronautics business from 1999 to 2002.

He has also participated in the C-130 revitalization, F-16 international expansion as well as the F-22 and F-35 development programs at Lockheed.

The U.S. Army veteran served on Hawker Beechcraft‘s board of directors before Textron acquired the Beechcraft business.

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Written by Neel Mehta

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