Oracle Helps NIH Build Cloud-Based Clinical Trial Registry

health IT
health IT

Oracle has built a cloud application system for a National Institutes of Health component to identify qualified participants for large-scale clinical trials of vaccines and monoclonal antibody therapies for the novel coronavirus.

The registry is designed to screen indviduals who have volunteered to join tests through the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases' COVID-19 Prevention Network, Oracle said Thursday.

More than 100K volunteers have been recorded by the CoVPN Volunteer Screening Registry less than one week since the platform went live.

According to the company, it developed other cloud systems to support the Department of Health and Human Services' COVID-19 response efforts and help clinicians understand the disease using data.

Oracle previously worked with Javara Research and Wake Forest Baptist Health to create a therapeutic learning system for health care providers to document patients' responses to coronavirus drugs.

The partnership extended system utilization to also help patients monitor, record and share data on their symptoms with medical professionals via smartphones.

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